The Boundaries of International Law a Feminist Analysis

In the first book devoted to the application of feminist theories of international law, Charlesworth and Chinkin argue that the absence of women in the development of international law produced a narrow and inadequate jurisprudence that legitimized, rather than confronted, the unequal position of women in the world. Foreword – Elizabeth Evatt, Human Rights Committee Foreword Introduction to the 2022 edition 1 Women and the international legal system 2 Feminist theories and international law 3 Forms of international law 4 The law of treaties 5 The idea of the state 6 International institutions 7 Human rights 8 The use of force in international law 9 Peaceful settlement of disputes 10 Redrawing the boundaries of international law Bibliography List of cases List of treaties Index 6 See, for example: Symposium on Method in International Law, 93 AJIL 291 (1999)Google Scholar (study of feminist methods alongside positivism, policy-oriented jurisprudence, international legal process, critical legal theory, theory of international relations, law and economics). With a new introduction reflecting the profound changes in international law since the book was first published in 2000, this provocative volume is essential reading for scholars, practitioners and students. 17 The influence of feminist criticism on Third World science seems considerable. See, for example, Murray, Rachel, The African Commission on Human and People`s Rights and International Law (2000)Google Scholar (an analysis of African human rights – by an insider of these processes – that confidently imitates feminist critiques and dichotomies). 12 See Tesón, op. cit. O., footnote 4; Anthony, D`Amato, Book Review, 89 AJIL 840 (1995)Google Scholar (Review of Women`s Human Rights: National and International Perspectives, supra note 7); Koskenniemi, op. cit. Cit. Note 5.

The authors` response to accusations of lack of objectivity is similar to that raised in response to those who would ban certain forms of “harmful” speech. See, for example, Vinson J.`s pluralistic opinion in Dennis v. United States, 341 U.S. 494 (1951) (noting that the foundation of the First Amendment is the assumption that harmful speech can be better combated by more speech). Like Vinson, Charlesworth and Chinkin`s response to gender and gender subjectivity in international law, no less, is more subjectivity: since international law does not even offer a “partial, consensual and formal distance” from subjectivity, we should not be bothered by an approach that recognizes that law has a political agenda (p. 22). Charlesworth and Chinkin, representing the first book dealing with the application of feminist theories of international law, argue that the absence of women in the development of international law has produced narrow and inadequate jurisprudence that has legitimized the unequal position of women in the world, rather than fighting it. The Limits of International Law offer a feminist perspective on the structure, processes and substance of international law. The authors examine its sources, treaty law, the concept of State and the right to self-determination, the role of international institutions and human rights law. Finally, questioning whether the inclusion of women in the jurisdiction of international war crimes tribunals represents a significant change in the boundaries of international law, The Limits of International Law is essential reading for academics, practitioners and students.

The Boundaries of International Law offer a feminist perspective on the structure, processes and substance of international law, shedding new light on the law of treaties, the concept of State and self-determination, the role of international institutions and human rights law. Finally, while the inclusion of women in the jurisdiction of international war crimes tribunals represents a significant shift in the boundaries of international law, the book encourages a radical overhaul of the discipline of international law. – No HTML tags allowed- URLs of web pages are only displayed as text- Lines and paragraphs wrap automatically- Attachments, images or tables are not allowed 7 See, for example, Reconceiving Reality: Women and International Law, op. cit. note 2; Human Rights of Women ational and International Perspectives (Cook, Rebecca ed., 1994)Google Scholar; Women and International Human Rights Law (Kelly, D. Askin & Koenig, Dorean eds., 1999-2001). Google Scholar Please list all fees and grants made in the last 36 months by organizations whose interests may be affected by the publication of the response. Please also list any non-financial associations or interests (personal, professional, political, institutional, religious or other) that a reasonable reader would like to know in relation to the submitted work. This applies to all authors of the play, their spouses or partners. 2 As Charlesworth reported, the fears were unfounded, but nonetheless revealing. Charlesworth, Hilary, Oscar alienating? Feminist Analysis of International Law, in Reconceiving Reality: Women and International Law 1, 15 n. 2 (Dorinda, G.

Dallmeyered., 1993)Google Scholar; voir aussi Charlesworth, Hilary, Subversive Trends in the Jurisprudence of International Law, 86 ASIL Proc. 125 (1992). Google Scholar 8 Voir Knop, Karen, Re/statements: Feminism and State Sovereignty in International Law, 3 Transnat’l L. & Contemp. 293, 306 (1993). Google Scholar 5 Koskennierai, Martti, Book Review, 89 AJIL 227, 230 (1995)Google Scholar (Reviewing Reconceiving Reality: Women and International Law, supra note 2). Découvrez d’autres livres de l’auteur, voyez des auteurs similaires, lisez des blogs d’auteurs, etc. Lisez instantanément dans votre navigateur avec Kindle Cloud Reader. 19 Voir Commitment and Compliance: The Role of Non-Binding Norms in the International Legal System (Shelton, Dinah ed., 2000)Google Scholar; Douglas, M.

Johnston, Book Review, 95 AJIL (à paraître en 2001)Google Scholar (review). 4 Voir Fernando, R. Teson, Feminism and International Law: A Reply, 33 Va. J. Int’l L. 647 (1993). Google Scholar 1 Charlesworth, Hilary, Chinkin, Christine, & Wright, Shelley, Feminist Approaches to International Law, 85 AJIL 613 (1991). CrossRefGoogle Scholar Consultez toutes les citations Google Scholar pour cet article.

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